New Reverspectives

newperpspectfi - New Reverspectives

Patrick Hughes’ reverspective is an iconic genre of art that has been around a very long time, over fifty years in fact. His first ‘reverspective’ was made in 1964! Perhaps the most enduring example of Hughes’ work that would come to peoples’ minds is Paradoxymoron in the British Library. Last year his ‘A Newer Perspective’ was exhibited at Flowers Gallery. This year, his ‘New Perspectives’ is exhibited at the nearby Alon Zakaim gallery in Dover Street.

DBKciEjWAAAYgCz - New Reverspectives

Paradoxymoron at the British Library. Source: Twitter

1468489507 3f4406b2f5bd53c0f3b75d1eb2b36b02 - New Reverspectives

A young Patrick Hughes with his ‘Sticking Out Room’ (1964.) Source: Global Art Traders

The latest exhibition of Patrick Hughes’ famous style of art is at Dover Street, just off Piccadilly and round the corner from Green Park station. I have seen examples of his work before elsewhere – and am familiar with his Paradoxymoron in the British Library, as well as Hughes’ studios in Great Eastern Street, Shoreditch. This latest exhibition I had not known about and discovered it somewhat by chance.

IMG 0453 - New Reverspectives

The Alon Zakaim gallery itself is one of many in the area, and its probably the newest too. Its set in a modern building which explains why the gallery space is quite ideal compared to others in older buildings. In this context Patrick Hughes’ work becomes quite apparent. Its a great exhibition and I would recommend it if one is in the area.

Th exhibition is set on two floors and runs until 29 March 2019. The ground floor consists of Hughes more original and noted works whilst those upstairs are smaller examples of his reverspective work and also mixed media artwork such as portraits – and piles of ‘books.’ (Its actually a work called Tall Books 2018.)

IMG 0451 1024x154 - New Reverspectives

Three of Hughes’ classic reverspectives scenes.

IMG 0450 1024x230 - New Reverspectives

Two more of Hughes’ classic reverspectives scenes.

IMG 0402 - New Reverspectives

This example is in the window display of the gallery overlooking Dover Street. Its called Robbing Banks and is one of Hughes’ latest works (2019.)

IMG 0435 - New Reverspectives

A Cardboard Box 2017. Normal perspective.

Notice how the whole perspective changes enormously with just a slight movement in one’s position!

IMG 0434 - New Reverspectives

A Cardboard Box 2017. Different perspective.

IMG 0408 - New Reverspectives

Stairs to the Stars 2016. Normal view.

When one observes the works from underneath they look quite different. The stairs look even bigger and the paintings even smaller!

IMG 0438 - New Reverspectives

Stairs to the Stars 2016. Underneath view.

The ‘Venice’ ones are quite good there are several variations on the theme, in fact there are eight different works on this particular subject.

IMG 0416 1024x328 - New Reverspectives

Venice Extravaganza 2018.

IMG 0411 - New Reverspectives

Laguana 2018.

IMG 0425 - New Reverspectives

Atlantis 2017.

IMG 0420 - New Reverspectives

Appropriately 2018. A sort of pop art version of Hughes’ work – with a reference to Damien Hirst!

There is one emerging trend that can be seen in Hughes’ work and that is the addition of extra windows (or whatever he calls these) which give even more interest to the works. Most will know his work consists of three, four five, truncated pyramidal shapes with paintings on them and when one moves about the paintings seem to change perspective.

With these additional little windows there’s even more perspective shift because so much more is going on, and these little windows seem to go the opposite direction to the main movement that is experienced.

IMG 0427 - New Reverspectives

Vasareally 2016. Normal perspective.

IMG 0429 - New Reverspectives

Vasareally 2016 viewed from underneath. This shows the smaller ‘windows’ Hughes has employed in his later work to give more effect.

IMG 0430 - New Reverspectives

A part of Trapezium 2018.

There is one based on Escher (its one of Hughes earlier works.) This and one or two others of the Venice pictures that I took did’nt work well so I haven’t included these.

Alon Zakaim Gallery

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *